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Diamond Pattern Overlay on Images for Brochure - PhotoShop or InDesign

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  • Diamond Pattern Overlay on Images for Brochure - PhotoShop or InDesign

    I am doing a trifold brochure in InDesign and wanted to use the following effect over two of the folds in the brochure. How should I create this effect. I would think it is better to do in PhotoShop. Should I create as a pattern and how would I do this? I wanted the diamond pattern to be an overlay for images and text. Below is the image that has the effect I wanted to recreate. Click image for larger version

Name:	Screen Shot 2016-12-17 at 4.19.08 PM.png
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  • #2
    A couple ways come to mind. Create the grid of lines in InDesign or Illustrator. Rotate them 45 degrees and either import the Illustrator file into a frame or group the lines and copy and paste into your frame. Scale as needed.
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    I like to beat up pacifists, because they don't fight back ...

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    • #3
      With thin lines it is probably better to do them as vector so I would do them in InDesign. Do them on another layer so they are easy to move etc. without getting mixed up with the other elements of the page.
      Time flies like an arrow - fruit flies like a banana

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      • #4
        Originally posted by StudioMonkey View Post
        With thin lines it is probably better to do them as vector so I would do them in InDesign. Do them on another layer so they are easy to move etc. without getting mixed up with the other elements of the page.
        Yes, but not necessarily, though. In the case of the thin lines over a photo, those lines will be defined by the halftone dots of the printed image, which will likely only be about 150 lpi. In other words, vector or not, the lines become integrated into the photo and defined by the screen frequency of the halftone. Even outside the photo in white areas (where I'd definitely use vector imagery for a variety of reasons), unless those lines will be printed using a solid spot color, they'll still be composed from relatively low lpi halftone dots.

        Another thing for the OP to consider: unless spot colors are used, those thin lines will be defined by CMYK rosettes or the digital equivalent. This being the case, those thin lines also run the risk of being slightly out of register, in which case unsightly rainbows along the line edges just might spoil the whole effect unless the registration is perfect.

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        • #5
          Thanks for your responses. B you sound like you really know your print stuff. After what you said I will have to think of another idea for the second spread which look very boring right now. I don't know if I should post what I have in the "Crit Pit" t I find I don't get much response when I want feedback on brochure layout.

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