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  • Indesign: where/how to edit pics?

    I placed a bunch of pictures in Indesign. Now they tell me the printer is dark so I need to lighten everything up. I think it would also be a good idea to convert the ones on grayscale pages into grayscale and play with contrasts. Is there a way to do this within indesign? If not, what do you suggest?

    (I happen to like MS Word's method of editing pictures within documents. I don't suppose indesign would be that simple?)

  • #2
    Best way is to right-click on the photo (or control-click on a 1-button mouse) and choose EDIT ORIGINAL. That will open Photoshop, where you can edit the photos. The right tool for the right job.
    This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
    "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

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    • #3
      InDesign is for layouts, not photo editing. Use Photoshop for that.
      Professional Pixel Pusher Designing the world around you. | Working daily to reach 10,000 hours of practice.

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      • #4
        The problem is, when I do "edit original" it takes me to microsoft paint! How can I "edit original" in photoshop?

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        • #5
          Oh, sorry, Mac guy here. I would change the application association in the "get info" window, but I'm Windows clueless. Someone else should be along shortly that knows what to do.
          This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
          "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Miss Perfect
            The problem is, when I do "edit original" it takes me to microsoft paint! How can I "edit original" in photoshop?
            You can assign which application you'd like to have open for vector and
            raster images in the Indesign preferences, if I recall.

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            • #7
              Open up an explorer window.

              Right Click the image (any image you want to associate) and then Change teh program from MS Paint to your actual image editor. >> C:\\program files\\adobe\\photoshop\\photoshop.exe (or something like that)

              Then all the images with that certain extention will open in photoshop from then on.

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              • #8
                Thanks for all the tips!

                One more question for now:
                If I have linked pictures, and I just open the original files in a photo editing program and edit them there, will they update in indesign accordingly?

                Earlier I was working in my school lab, but it's closed now, and my home computer is unbearably slow with adobe programs. I'm hoping I can lighten up the pictures in picasa or something and it will be fine when I send it out to print.

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                • #9
                  InDesign will update your photos but you have to go to the links palette and select all with yellow triangles and tell it to update the preview.

                  Picasa? Isn't that a web image share program? Does it work at print resolution?

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                  • #10
                    Be very careful with Picasa. I find it automatically changes the resolution of the images you upload. At least that was the default behavior when I used it one day when photobucket was down. There was no warning and I didn't know until I tried to post the image in a forum like this one. The image size and resolution were greatly reduced.

                    Photoshop really is your best bet.
                    This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
                    "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by garricks
                      Be very careful with Picasa. I find it automatically changes the resolution of the images you upload. At least that was the default behavior when I used it one day when photobucket was down. There was no warning and I didn't know until I tried to post the image in a forum like this one. The image size and resolution were greatly reduced.

                      Photoshop really is your best bet.
                      Good to know. I'm currently working with a guy that knows just enough about "desktop publishing" *shudder* to make himself a nuisance when it comes to getting resources. He sent me a bunch of pictures through Picasa that are very borderline usability-wise. They'll be printed small so it's not a huge issue. When I questioned him about having any better resolution images and if they'd been optimized by the Picasa software his explanation left me with the impression that Picasa was just one of those proprietary photo managers that usually comes with a digital camera. (Of course many of those do an auto-optimize for email too. ) I still had my doubts, but I let it slide without doing any more checking. I only have so much time for "butt wiping" as my colleagues and I like to refer to it.

                      It's probably too late on this project, but now I'll know to beat him over the head with it a bit more next time around!

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                      • #12
                        I have a coworker who uses smugmug. It's a paid site, but you can upload full res images, and people can download full res or resized images. You can make the galleries private and password protect them. I have a flickr account i've never used, because photobucket is fine for my current needs. So I don't know if flickr resizes or not... ?
                        This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
                        "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Picassa DOES resample images when you email them, or use any of the auto handoff stuff. It makes sense to do that, when you think about it. There are prefs you can set to control the max pixel dimension. If you use Export-- and set the prefs to NOT resize, it won't. But that does bring up one thing I don't like about Picassa (and in general I think it's a terrific program): you can only export to JPGs. And remember,any adjustments you make in tuning within Picassa are not permanently applied to the images unless you ask it to Save. The default is just to keep a small Picassa.ini file in the pic directory which contains the editing commands you want applied at EXPORT.

                          Back to grayscaling and lightening all the photos in an ID file. Another think that might work is to simply export to a regular CMYK prepress level PDF, then open that in Acrobat Pro and use the Advanced/Printing Options/Colours... to bring up the change to Grayscale dbox. Depending on your image gammas at the point, you could select a different greyscale gamma for your target output to get some control over tonal translation.

                          If your files are all resting in the same folder, you can also easily setup a batch action in Pshop to apply whatever you like in terms of a lightening. Personally, I would use one that simply adds a top Curve adjustment layer and keep things non-destructive.

                          You can also access these kind of batch operation directly in Adobe Bridge.

                          If you have neither of those apps, and can't afford one, check out third party image batch processors. Irfanview is an excellent one for the Windows side.

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                          • #14
                            Dunno, I've never uploaded to Picasa -- it's a program I downloaded onto my computer and as far as I know it keeps the resolution the same. Anyway, I ended up doing it on Corel Photopaint, which is only a little slow on that computer.

                            Yossarian -- I feel your pain. I had one such wannabe on my case last issue, and I made the mistake of leaving the indesign file accessible to the editors in chief on the school's computer... Let's just say the only reason I invested so much in this issue is because I have to earn my name back. (unfortunately, his tampering did not include the removal of my name from the layout credit) Needless to say, this time I kept a firm hold on all the files until everything was safely converted to PDF!

                            Thanks again for all you help. This site rocks.

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