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  • Carlo
    Reply to Changing color mode InDesign
    Carlo
    Depends on the version of InDesign you are working with and if you use color in other parts of your document that you want to maintain.

    If you have cs6 or later you can convert your color...
    Today, 11:13 PM
  • PrintDriver
    Reply to Anybody use a Mac Mini?
    PrintDriver
    We only use minis to run AV equipment. :}
    If you are going to use a mini, I might still suggest you get outboard file storage. A small RAID or high cap SSD.
    Every "adapter" you will...
    Today, 11:01 PM
  • Aurust
    Illustrator Quick Click Copy
    Aurust
    I was wondering if there is a quick easy way to copy a graphic and then have it pasted every time I click? I've tried the Alt+drag copy but it gets a little tiring quickly. Is there any way to accomplish...
    Today, 09:50 PM
  • KrazyLady
    Comment on My First Design Assignment.
    KrazyLady
    Hi Billy, Thanks for your feedback I had to lower the resolution to get the file small enough to post on this forum. (that's the only way I know how to make a file smaller at this point). If there...
    Today, 09:24 PM
  • iyiyi
    Reply to Anybody use a Mac Mini?
    iyiyi
    Awesome. Thanks! Ya, it will have 16gb which is double what my pro is right now....
    Today, 08:52 PM
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  • #16
    thanks everyone! great advice!

    Comment


    • #17
      I use the Advanced Options/PDF Optimizer to get to the Audit button to analyze where all the fat in a PDF lies.

      99 times out of 100 the bulk in these problem PDFs is in something called 'content streams' -- and it seems almost as frequently, the 'Optimize' routine does not remove it, even when checked (though, if it does, it's usually the result of flattening an un-flattened file).

      In these cases, I often resort to a 'refry': place the PDF into InDesign and create a new PDF.

      Another source is embedded color profiles, which in smaller documents, can account for over half the 'weight' of the file. Again, solved by not including them when created, or doing a refry with appropriate switches and colour settings set to override embedding policies.
      Last edited by Bob; 10-08-2010, 03:51 PM.

      Comment


      • #18
        I've found that printing a PDF to PDF again (via cuteftp or Microsoft's PDF printer) will take a PDF file size down considerably. It works in a pinch, anyway.

        Comment


        • #19
          Yeh but

          Transparency is flattened
          Hyperlinks are removed (and other interactivity)
          Tagging is stripped (for accessibility)
          Colour profiles are stripped out (no colour management)
          PDF layers are compressed to a single layer

          "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

          Comment


          • #20
            Reduce file size in Adobe Acrobat took it from 63MB to 33MB
            Export using Small File Size option instead of High Quality Print made a 23MB file
            Reduce file size in Adobe Acrobat took it from 23MB to 17.5MB
            Awesome reduction. I'll use a file transfer website just in case 17.5MB still chokes their inbox.

            Comment


            • #21
              All that reduction is not good for a print file... just sayin'.
              Most regular email has a cut off at 5mb - 10mb on attachments. As a printer, our cutoff is 10mb. Beyond that, you use our ftp or your own.

              Comment


              • #22
                I agree with PD.

                All that reduction is going to cause problems at print stage.

                You could use Yousendit to send large files - or you can use a service like Drop Box.

                And more straightforward - an FTP site, as PD mentioned.

                "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

                Comment


                • #23
                  You get it to print quality - full stop end of story. No point in sacarafice quality for disk space.

                  Use FTPs, File Sharing Websites, etc. to send the files. Size shouldn't be an issue in this day and age.

                  (QFT in OOC )

                  "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I had a 36 page Indesign document the other day that was 46MB when saved for print. But the client wanted it to be smaller enough to email. Smallest size pdf was still 12MB which was too big for this client. Eventually I just deleted the watermark background picture and a handful of other non-neccessary pictures and that got it down to 3.9MB.

                    Sometimes, if it's not for print, you can make a few sacrifices.
                    It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

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                    • #25
                      I have a magazine that's 120 pages and it's 32mb for print. For the web it's 2mb.

                      I find the smallest file size works ok - but running the PDF optimiser really cuts out a lot more - especially for emailing.

                      "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by eugenetyson View Post
                        I have a magazine that's 120 pages and it's 32mb for print. For the web it's 2mb.

                        I find the smallest file size works ok - but running the PDF optimiser really cuts out a lot more - especially for emailing.
                        Wow. That's impressive! Were there many images?
                        It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn't use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like "What about lunch?" Winnie the Pooh

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Yeh it's fairly image heavy.

                          There's an events section at the end with about 30 photos per edition. There's 10 articles with half page images, plus all the author photos (so between 20 - 25 images per article). There's about 10 Regular Feature articles, each with their own photo and author photos. Then 10 internal articles with the author photo and an accompanying article image. One of the articles has news from around the world and a flag for each countries news - so that's about another 20 images.

                          Looking at 28 files with about 120mb of data in the InDesign files.

                          103 images (roughly) @ 135mb.

                          That's not including the cover (3 supplied adverts, and front cover image)


                          All in all I finely tuned the PDF to be the smallest file size at just the right resolution for printing.


                          In saying that I got a 20mb PDF from a designer before for a 2 sided leaflet. I was not impressed lol.

                          "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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                          • #28
                            Our magazine files can be quite large as well. But we have vector maps in them, and that just bloats the size beyond belief.
                            I'd rather be hated for who I am, than loved for who I am not. ~ Kurt Cobain

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                            • #29
                              Prior to CS5 you could use the Transparency Flattner to Rasterise vectors if you set their opacity to 99.9% - but that's no longer in CS5 - it was very handy for making web pdfs. Of course if you used 1.4 pdf then it flattened, but anything after that and you couldn't flatten so it remained vector. CS5 randomly chooses without any logic which areas to rasterise and you get incosistent results

                              Anyway - might be a handy way to get web ready pdfs a good bit lower in file size if you're using CS4 or earlier

                              "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Digi your post was really very nice, got a good information from your reply ..!
                                The topic was really very useful..!
                                You should flatten the transparency by going in transparency tool..!
                                Many thanks

                                Comment

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