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  • #16
    Awesome videos Euge... er, Hank. Thanks!

    Q: I'm looking at the sample file that was included with the 'Rules Rule' video. The last example:



    That little glyph there... had me going. I see it's in the glyph set panel--another ID area I've had little to do with. In the Story Editor it appears as a lowercase j. But... it's obviously not. No Styles applied. So, does the Story Editor map the display of Glyphs differently for its display, or how does that work?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by ihadlegs View Post
      Wow, thanks for that! I shall be forwarding this to her to play with now, paragraph styles I have avoided in the past as I ended up ruining a fair few documents. Muchio gracias, and to printdriver, I had a feeling printers hated cells.

      *stops banging head and feeling quite so stupid* *a bit*
      Paragraph Styles and Character Styles, et al Styles are your friend.

      I shall recommend Michael Murphy once again with is excellent book

      http://www.amazon.com/Adobe-InDesign.../dp/032160606X


      For beginners you can't go wrong with Sandee Cohen Quick Start Guide
      http://www.amazon.com/InDesign-CS5-M.../dp/0321705203

      These are also available for several versions of InDesign - so get the one closest to the version you have.

      "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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      • #18
        Bob - that appears to be Adobe Caslon Pro - in the Glyph Panel there's an arrow beside the lower case "j" click and hold for "Alternate" glyphs.

        The story editor displays just the text - and it is using the letter "j" - so that's what it shows. It's a great way to find out what Letter was used to produce a certain Glyph.

        A lot of fonts have Alternate Glyphs - check some out in Adobe Garamond Pro - for example. There's ornaments, scientific figures - loads of things.


        A lot of well made fonts will have built in alternate glyphs, mostly for ligatures.

        "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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