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  • #16
    Quark broke my heart. And it makes me angry. When it was the standard layout DTP app for newspapers and magazines and it worked, it was brilliant. Then it got ADHD, ooooh lookie! Internet!! shiney object!!! And never again addressed the people THAT paid $900 for a license in 1995. And when I have to use Quark now, 6.5 is a shadow of what 4.1 was.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Cosmo View Post
      Because he swears that printing from PDF's makes his photos look too dark.

      He also will only supply photos in EPS format.


      No idea why, but that's all he'll give us.
      Psuedographicdesign fears


      EPS is yesteryear file format. It's so ropey and RIPs (modern ones) in lithographic printing are geared towards PDF workflows.

      PDF is the format that is replacing EPS as the standard. It should have happened years ago.


      I too have a design company that saves all the images to EPS. I hate that. They'll download a stock photo that's in RGB and convert it to CMYK and then save it as an EPS.

      I insert all my RGB JPGs into my design layout. Unless I have a reason for editing them, I'll only save to TIFF, PSD or PDF, depending on what I need to use it for.

      The future of the EPS file format

      EPS is rapidly becoming an outdated file format which is being replaced by PDF just like PostScript itself is also being phased out and replaced by PDF. Here is what Dov Isaacs from Adobe said in a discussion on a PrintPlanet forum about the future of PostScript: “ …Adobe will continue to support EPS as a legacy graphics format for import of non-color managed, opaque graphical data into Adobe applications (such as InDesign and Illustrator). Although we certain do not recommend that new graphical content be stored in EPS format (except to satisfy the need to import data into page layout programs that aren’t quite PDF-centric — no need to mention names here!), our user base should feel comfortable that there is no need to worry about a need to convert their very sizable libraries of EPS-based graphic assets.”
      http://www.prepressure.com/library/file-formats/eps
      Last edited by hank_scorpio; 08-15-2011, 04:26 AM.

      "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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      • #18
        There's a reason that people using Quark supply images as .eps files.
        If the printer doesn't know enough (or simply forgets) to TELL Quark to download all the image information, Quark only sends enough for the current layout scale. If the image has been, or will be scaled, the only sure-fire, idiot proof way to get all the image information to print was to save as .eps.

        And don't get me started on all the wrong things Quark can do in PDF or in going from Postscript to PDF...
        If he sends the raw file and the printer screws it up, it's on the printer, right?

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        • #19
          We only ever took in Quark files with all the links and fonts. PDFs weren't quite centric to the workflow then. I never made a PDF directly out of Quark. Our RIP, a Rampage, required us to insert a special file (xtension required) called an EPSF. And the RIP would make FPOs of all the pages, which the imposition guy would take into Preps.

          Back then I was using EPS for everything. Little did I know how much of an issue can arise from using them.

          "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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          • #20
            Originally posted by eugenetyson View Post
            We only ever took in Quark files with all the links and fonts. PDFs weren't quite centric to the workflow then. I never made a PDF directly out of Quark. Our RIP, a Rampage, required us to insert a special file (xtension required) called an EPSF. And the RIP would make FPOs of all the pages, which the imposition guy would take into Preps.

            Back then I was using EPS for everything. Little did I know how much of an issue can arise from using them.
            Ugh. I remember doing just that same thing myself. Did the jobs come in on Syquest discs too?

            I think I remember that when Quark first came out it would not recognize .tif files, which is why everyone used .eps. I may be wrong about that though...
            http://brokenspokedesign.com

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            • #21
              It recognized them all the way back to V3.1 at least.

              The trouble we always had where I worked as a designer lay in the scaling factor. Cuz Q's artboard is so stupid small, we always had to work in scale. If you are working in 1/4 scale and place a tif, then output at 400%, Quark would only send enough info on the tif to produce it at 1/4 scale and it would pixelate. Heaven help you if you were working in 1:10 or 1:12. Later versions of Quark you could tell it to send all image date in the print dialog box. The .eps format would also help prevent the stair-stepping and other crazy gaffs it would make if the image was rotated.
              .eps image formats got to be a habit.

              I do NOT miss Quark.

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              • #22
                Eight years ago professors were saying Quark is the industry standard. Glad I ignored them and used InDesign from the start.

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                • #23
                  ^^Yeah, it didn't take long for Adobe to gain a huge foothold with InDesign when you could buy Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign as a package for pretty much the same amount as Quark all buy itself. That pretty much guaranteed that students with no previous investment in Quark would favor InDesign. And when you figure in that Quark felt so secure in abusing their captive customer base, lots of designers jumped ship.

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by vectorman View Post
                    Eight years ago professors were saying Quark is the industry standard. Glad I ignored them and used InDesign from the start.
                    Well, when it was Quark vs. Pagemaker, Quark definitely was the industry standard. A lot of designers (myself included) resisted switching to InDesign when it first came out. I eventually did and am glad that I did, but old habits die hard.
                    http://brokenspokedesign.com

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                    • #25
                      I had no resitance to switching. I was shown that drop shadows, bevels, etc. could be done right inside indesign and I thought WOW. Anyone pre-InDesign era won't know what it was like to apply drop shadows on to a colour background.

                      I didn't need any convincing. I saw the interface, the better tools and made the switch ASAP.

                      "May your hats fly as high as your dreams"Michael Scott

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                      • #26
                        Back in the days when Quark was king and when I was the design director at a newspaper, we needed a pagination system for a weekly tabloid that was bundled in with the paper on Saturdays.

                        I called up Quark and asked to speak to a sales person about the Quark Publishing System (QPS), which at the time, was an expensive, high-end system that had to be purchased directly from Quark.

                        After two or three attempts, I finally got hold of a sales person who upon me telling him that we wanted about $40,000 (if I remember right) worth of software, promptly told me that he was hungry and needed to get off the phone so he could go to lunch. He never called back.

                        A couple of days later, I dialed their number again and spoke to another sales person who, for some reason, thought I was inquiring about a Windows version of QPS. He started in on a rant about how he and most everyone at Quark hated Macs and would like nothing better than to throw all their resources into Windows development if it weren't for those stupid Mac users. When I told him that I was actually inquiring about the Mac version of QPS because we wanted the Mac version, he stumbled around and said he'd call back with more information, which he never did.

                        This pretty much lead us to think that we were looking at an unreliable company, so we switched gears and started researching newspaper-specific pagination solutions.

                        About a month later, a representative from Quark shows up unannounced at the paper wanting to speak to me. The front counter receptionist calls my phone, and I think this person is here to talk to me about QPS, so I have the receptionist bring her back to my office. So I'm sitting down with this Quark representative and she announces that she's not there to talk about QPS. Instead she's there to check out each of our Macs to see if we're running pirated copies of their software, which we weren't. We politely kicked her butt out of the building.

                        So yeah, I've never had much love for QuarkXPress, and I gladly abandoned it altogether when InDesign first appeared.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by <b> View Post
                          I called up Quark and asked to speak to a sales person about the Quark Publishing System (QPS), which at the time, was an expensive, high-end system that had to be purchased directly from Quark.
                          Remember it well, still got my QPS certificate and t-shirt somewhere!

                          Never actually got to install a system, but had a fun two-weeks in Denver

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by bulgariacalling View Post
                            Remember it well, still got my QPS certificate and t-shirt somewhere!

                            Never actually got to install a system, but had a fun two-weeks in Denver
                            Well, you got further with them than I did.

                            Coincidentally, I just returned earlier today from visiting a friend in Denver (wife's friend, actually) and a several-day camping trip in the Rockies. It is a nice city, but the mountains are beautiful.

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                            • #29
                              I remember when Quark was trying to make it the Printers' responsibility to check that each file they received from a designer was made on a copy of Quark licensed to that designer. If I remember right, the print industry immediately told Quark to go F themselves and do their own policing.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                I tried to update my personal Quark license from 3.32 to 4.whatever. The online system told me I couldn't crossgrade from PC to Mac. I've never run Quark on a PC. It was Mac to Mac. Sales reps & help desk were of no use. That's how I ended up using InDesign at home, and convincing the bosses to switch to InDesign for our dozen licenses at work.

                                And I was fairly direct with the Quark rep who called me at work 2 years later to get me to upgrade.
                                This post is brought to you by the letter E and the number 9. Those are the buttons I push to get a Twix out of the candy machine.
                                "I put my heart and my soul into my work, and have lost my mind in the process."

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                                • HotButton
                                  Comment on Flyer Crtitique
                                  HotButton
                                  It's just what I call it when people use an expression that actually says or means the opposite of what is intended; ''could care less'' would be another prime example.
                                  Yesterday, 11:44 PM
                                • B
                                  Reply to Flyer Crtitique
                                  B
                                  That makes sense, I guess. Off is the inverse of on, which makes based off the inverse of based on. Got it. ...
                                  Yesterday, 08:50 PM
                                • B
                                  Reply to Flyer Crtitique
                                  B
                                  Okay, I know what a colloquialism is, but what is an inverse colloquialism?

                                  Probrien, in addition to HotButton's comments, which I agree with, the ad is a bit confusing. Maybe it's lacking...
                                  Yesterday, 08:48 PM
                                • PrintDriver
                                  Reply to Flyer Crtitique
                                  PrintDriver
                                  ''Based off'' is inverse of ''based on.'' ''Based on'' is a colloquialism.
                                  I think.
                                  I have not had enough to drink to play this game.

                                  o O
                                  Yesterday, 08:27 PM
                                • pobrien
                                  Reply to Flyer Crtitique
                                  pobrien
                                  Thanks for the feedback. That all makes a lot of sense. I'll take these points and re-work things....
                                  Yesterday, 04:06 PM
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