Delivering of Final Packaging Design to Client

Most designers deliver the final product for their clients in different ways under different price ranges, from Low prices to high price ranges.
So, based on what points do they make their quotations? I’m guessing they’ll use the following. And if there are any more things, please add them.

Number of package items/ Design concepts to prapose/ Full product wrapping/ Print-ready/ Dielines/ 3D mockup/ Source file/ Revisions etc.

I can understand many of the points here, but I want to understand more of the facts. Can anyone help me out with this?

01 - What is the meaning of full product wrapping? If I say “At this price rate you will get full product wrap without any extras” What files/formats do I deliver to them?

02 - Source file. If I send a source file to them what it should contain? (Please guess, artwork done by the illustrator software)

01 - What is the meaning of full product wrapping? If I say “At this price rate you will get full product wrap without any extras” What files/formats do I deliver to them?

Whatever is covered in the contract and what you agreed on the outset.
File formats, whatever the native file formats were for the application you used, InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop, Quark, Affinity, Inkscape, whatever application you used.

Fonts - they need to buy themselves or supply you a license to use their fonts.
Or something similar

02 - Source file. If I send a source file to them what it should contain? (Please guess, artwork done by the illustrator software)
You don’t know what source files are?
You don’t know what they should contain?

Are you ready for this?

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  1. Understand that. Thanks
    02.(Illustrator) Editable version including Fronts and link images. That is what i know.

You are not yet ready grasshopper…
Did you read what Smurf wrote?
Fonts have licenses that are usually not transferable.
Images have licenses or restrictions that do not allow transfer.
Good luck.

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You seem out of your depth, but we all started somewhere. Start thinking about how your work serves their business.

No deliverables aren’t based on the price range, they’re based on the initial contract and the clients needs. What is the pack type? How are they printing it? That’s also a function of how many they are printing, you should consider this stuff up front. What’s the substrate? Are their spot colors? Does it need a white plate? Where did you get your dieline?

Based on that you deliver something that’s functional for their business - something they can use to send to a printer. A pdf is usually a good choice. If the initial contract specifies it, then you should also deliver working files. You can package it all out of illustrator in one shot. It also gives you a report to preflight your files.

Also see the above comments regarding licensed files. That’s actually important.

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Could you send me your complete instruction for work and send the high-resolution file?

Why would they do that?

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Because I have 50+ experiences in a graphics design team. If I have got the full intrusion of the work, I will pass my graphics production team, and they have done her problem

With 50 years you must understand the words proprietary work. Why would the OP send their client files to a completely random and unknown stranger on the internet. If I did that without first contracting the services I’d be fired.

Also if you go back and reread the original post it would appear there are no files. Just a question of what deliverables should be in any given circumstance. There’s nothing there for you to fix. Heck I’m not even sure what kind of “wrap” they are even talking about😁

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No my friend, @yusufcpu said “50+ experiences”, which can only mean he(?) has been involved in 50+ different industries.

Ah, the old brain added words in there that don’t exist. But that is even more to my point. :slight_smile:

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Yeah that part confused me too. I just assumed they were distinguishing between designing the primary display panel and the rest. We did that because the FDA had specific requirements for that panel and because everything else gets hidden on the shelf.

I’m sorry to say that it’s 50+ Graphics Designer members in my Team.