Font licensing

As I start my freelance business, I was planning on using the fonts that are available in the Adobe Cloud for the majority of my projects for clients. According to Adobe, the fonts within that software are licensed for commercial use.

A few questions arise with this:
-Is this what most freelancers use for fonts?
-Is this safe to do?
-I have a limited startup budget, but I have budgeted a small amount for additional font bundle purchases. Should I add more to this and rely less on the Adobe provided fonts?

As a type designer myself, I’m biased since Adobe is, as is their usual practice, destroying their competition through their monopolistic practices.

As for what I use in the way of fonts. I probably have 5–10 go-to fonts that I use 95 percent of the time, and I own copies of them all. If I need something in a pinch, I’ll use Adobe’s fonts, but I’m gradually switching from the Adobe bloatware monthly extortion racket to Affinity’s suite of design software. I don’t like either my work or my fonts being held for ransom by Adobe when I finally decide to stop paying them.

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Nice.
This raises many other questions that I simply cannot wrap my mind around at this point. Maybe some other time…

But fonts… so as a type designer, are you not finding the need to purchase font bundles on a regular basis? Are you suggesting that I should avoid using adobe fonts because that may give them some copyrights over my IP buy using their commercially licensed fonts?

Basically I’m hoping that I can rely on the Adobe fonts for 90% of the work that I hope to do. Otherwise I will need to rework my starting budget to allow for hundreds of $ worth of font purchases.

Dangit, ‘B’. You’re making my head hurt.

Type design is just a side thing I do. I still do general graphic design work, but even there, my need for lots of different fonts is minimal. Like I mentioned 95% of my work uses the same 5–10 fonts. When I need a different typeface from those I have, I’ll either buy it (well, the client usually buys it), use a Google font or, in the case with logos, design or modify my own letters.

No, I’m not suggesting that at all. I was expressing my dislike of Adobe’s business practices. They’re the giant in this industry, and they use that position to quash competitors and carelessly run over bystanders. With fonts, for example, there are dozens of foundries designing them, which has been the case for several hundred years.

Adobe has their own in-house font design group. Making those (and other) fonts freely available to their customers does two things: (1) it helps solidify Adobe’s monopolistic graphics industry role by providing free, high-quality fonts to their CC subscribers and (2) as a side effect, this is driving hundreds of small font foundries out of business, along with the innovation that comes from these small foundries.

Looking down the road, 5–10 years, Adobe will have inadvertently driven most foundries out of business. Left standing will be a gutted Monotype still selling their old classics and Adobe being the main place where most people rent their fonts. Of course there will still be the junk font sites that give away all the sloppy hobbyist fonts uploaded to them. In other words, Adobe (and Google to a lesser extent), through their marketing hubris, will have, in essence, severely crippled a once thriving professional type design industry that is still needed.

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