Here is my new design. Justify why it should exist

I have been looking at a lot of things posted in the Crit Pit and have been blown away by people posting projects that don’t have a purpose. I know there are students and individuals that like to dabble in the software, but I think it’s crazy that they ask for a critique. It shows that they don’t really understand the purpose of graphic design, but rather think it works like traditional art. A “graphic design” project that doesn’t communicate is actually just decoration.

I just needed to vent. I’m trying to have empathy for new learners, but it’s difficult when the foundation of the discussion is not there. Has anyone else dealt this before (on here or in real life)?

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Most professionals won’t be posting much in the Crit Pit since their work is for real clients or employers. Besides, they typically get feedback elsewhere. We get quite a bit of student work, which seems to be better conceived and directed. The bulk of it, though, seems to be from amateurs who don’t have the basics down.

I wouldn’t see this as a reflection on the state of our profession — just the dynamics that play out here.

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I think it’s worth venting about.

I’d also say it’s a good test of patience to deal with those who don’t understand the types of things you are talking about, because, them coming here might be the only chance they have of someone telling them “you’re way of course”.

Blows from a friend are more valuable than kisses from an enemy (or fake friend).

The field of graphic design is so widely misunderstood, that a place like this forum is one of the few places in some people’s world where they can actually begin to learn beyond the trendy societal cliches of “graphic design” (I’ve been asked numerous times if that meant “movie special effects”) and move into a nuanced grasp of this prestigious and long-lived aspect of human history.

It’s a big job on our part.

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I try to consider the source. Keyword “try.”
But the GDF is, and always has been, a resource for those often not qualified to do this job. I’ve hung around here mostly in a print production capacity because I like to hope that occasionally my advice will save one of those in my profession from tearing his/her hair out. Vain hope probably, but it keeps me from being bored sometimes too.

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truth has been spoken

Your advice is still needed, I estimate. For reference; I’m a web designer, but my wife’s job and entire world in relation to design is print-related (she works at a sign/printing business). The rest of the world may or may not be 50/50 between digital and print, but print still isn’t dead in the year 2019. Sorry David Carson.

“print” in the broad sense will never die.
It will exist in one form or another forever.

As someone who didn’t study graphic design, but has done some research on graphic design, I feel like I’ll always miss some essential basics. It makes me more hesitant of creating my own portfolio and that I have what it takes to work as a graphic designer. I do want to start working as a graphic designer and I still want to apply for jobs before new years, but it’s hard when you’re not very well prepared to do a job you’re expected to do well, especially with the pressure of a deadline. But I’m so very fed up with not working in the creative field. I really miss it and I hate doing other jobs for companies that don’t value the work you do. So I need to get my portfolio down and start searching for a new workplace. Anyway I’m happy that I can ask some noob questions around here or read about answers that I didn’t know before, because where else would I get such specific answers? Who else would review my work?

I do think that some questions from new members are way too obvious and that the answers can be found easily on the internet in a single search, and that creates some frustration on my end personally. Although there are some who don’t know how to phrase a search because they are no native- or good english speakers. So it’s always difficult to judge that.

The question of whether or not a university degree is needed comes up here quite often. In some parts of the world, it’s becoming increasingly necessary. But that question is different from whether or not it’s possible to learn graphic design outside a college or university.

I think it’s possible to do so, but more difficult. When given the choice, people have a tendency to focus on those things they like the most or can do best. In a good, formal design curriculum, students are exposed to most of the basics and required to work hardest on those things they might be least adept at doing. After graduation, there shouldn’t be many gaps in basic knowledge, and there should be a good understanding of what one is capable of doing. In other words, a good foundation has been laid.

Although it’s becoming increasingly more difficult, I think it’s possible to form this same foundation on the job if one is fortunate enough to get a job at the right place with the right mentors who are willing to hire someone with little to no experience. Most business won’t do that anymore since it’s more cost-efficient to hire from the glut of college-trained designers who already know the ropes. I suppose it’s possible — even without a formal education — through a series of non-skilled jobs, for a focused beginning designer to move up through the ranks to better jobs while picking up more knowledge and experience. Even so, that person will soon run into the prejudice of employers requiring degrees.

As for teaching oneself, on one’s own, through online tutorials and books, I’m not at all sure it’s possible given the lack of feedback, critiques and direction from more experienced and knowledgable designers. Lots of people have taught themselves how to design logos or learned how to successfully navigate crowd sourcing sites or become proficient at various kinds of software. Sometimes these people get very good at those tasks, but there are still giant, gaping holes in their knowledge due to things they’ve never encountered or had a need to learn about.

With the mix of more experienced designers and newbies, I think forums like this one can fill in some of the gaps for some people. It’s no substitute for school and the critiques that happen there, but sometimes people’s misconceptions can be challenged and various ideas put out on the table that might not have been considered otherwise.

Lots of people have taught themselves how to design logos or learned how to successfully navigate crowd sourcing sites or become proficient at various kinds of software. Sometimes these people get very good at those tasks, but there are still giant, gaping holes in their knowledge due to things they’ve never encountered or had a need to learn about.
With the mix of more experienced designers and newbies, I think forums like this one can fill in some of the gaps for some people. It’s no substitute for school and the critiques that happen there, but sometimes people’s misconceptions can be challenged and various ideas put out on the table that might not have been considered otherwise.

Exactly my point, I’m an animation graduate (or was about almost 10 years ago) and I’ve had some basics of design but did most of the research myself on the job (where I was actually doing animation but given the title graphic designer, so I figured I better learn about it) and I’ve seen plenty of drawing courses and tutorials to know enough about color theory and other things. But I’m also lucky to have a great partner who is willing to help me out by getting me books or courses whenever he or I think it can be useful (he’s a cg artist) still, there is a lack of a mentor or a teacher who directly can share their experience from a real gd job and stuff. So I’m trying to fill in that gap by asking you guys.

Without a formal education, I suppose it’s possible — even without a formal education — through a series of non-skilled jobs, for a focused beginning designer to move up through the ranks to better jobs while picking up more knowledge and experience. Even so, that person will soon run into the prejudice of employers requiring degrees.

This is what I’m trying to do and look for. I don’t mind getting a job at a boring company, at this stage I’m very happy to be getting any offer for a junior designer even though that means I’m starting over again. I want to start, learn and grow and gain enough experience and also add in a little motion gfx when the time is right. But for now my main focus is on graphic design and illustration, because this will get me there and the jobs that I had were only dragging me down. Who knows I learned a couple of things from them and about people, but they were pretty depressing.

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