How seven of the most famous logos were created

Salvador Dali / Chupa Chups
The Chupa Chups logo was designed by Salvador Dali. The work took the Spanish artist just an hour to complete. The colors come from the Spanish flag.

Carolyn Davidson / Nike
Carolyn Davidson was a student at Portland State when she designed the Nike logo. She was paid $35 for her logo, but was given stock later (now worth $643k). Mr Knight, founder of Nike originally said: ‘Well, I don’t love it, but maybe it will grow on me’.

Frank Mason Robinson / Coca-Cola
The famous Coca-Cola logo was created by John Pemberton’s bookkeeper, Frank Mason Robinson, in 1885. Robinson came up with the name and chose the logo’s distinctive cursive script. The typeface used, known as Spencerian script, was developed in the mid-19th century and was the dominant form of formal handwriting in the United States during that period.

Milton Glaser / I Love NY
Milton Glaser, graphic designer was inspired by a campaign entitled “Montreal, the city with a heart”. Glaser did the work pro bono. His original sketches are now in display at the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Paul Rand / NeXT
Paul Rand gave an ultimatum to Steve Jobs. You pay me $100,000 and I will only present one option. 2 weeks later Rand presented the NeXT logo. Steve only asked the ‘e’ to be a brighter yellow.

Rob Janoff / Apple
Rob Janoff designed the original rainbow Apple logo in 1977 when he was working for the agency Regis McKenna as an art director. The only direction he got from Steve Jobs: “don’t make it cute”. Out of the two presented options one with and one without the bite fortunately Jobs chose the one with more personality.

Walter Landauer / FedEx
Walter Landauer was a brand design legend and the founder of Landor Associates mostly known for designing the FedEx logo. It was a product of a long process of creating and reviewing over 200 designs. The CEO of FedEx on the presentation spotted the arrow right away.

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Lindon Leader was actually the designer of the FedEx logo, but he was working for Walter Landor at Landor Associates at the time.

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Thanks for that!

I’d never noticed the arrow before. It’s brilliant!

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Very interesting.

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