How to create this effect

How would you guys create this glow effect as a screen print?

201810%2099%20Blue%20Neon%20Wall%20DEV_0239%20-%20small%5B1%5D

I’m assuming two things

  1. that isn’t the real image you are using
  2. that you are doing this effect on a t-shirt or similar.

Screen print doesn’t take too kindly to gradient or transparency effects.
They require a line screen (halftone) and most silk screen is too course to effectively do that. if you can live with around a 60lpi, you might find someone who can do it, if you set it up properly for spot color printing. Gradients, forget it.

However, some places are capable of 4-color screen printing, but you will have rosettes.

The only other option is a direct print, as in a direct to garment print. You will get just as good a print as a decent resolution desktop inkjet. Or you could do a dye-sub transfer print on a light colored shirt. I don’t recommend those off the shelf things you print yourself and use a home iron to apply.

Thanks for your reply @PrintDriver I should have clarified haha
This is for a screen print on a t-shirt. They wanted the blue LED backlit effect that is in the photo replicated. This is the original logo

30%20PM

Kinda sounds like from what you are saying I should steer them in another direction, since it will probably be difficult to do what they want? Maybe a transfer instead of screen print would be better?

I’d say yes; transfer or direct-to-garment would be the better bet, although don’t forget the critical role the color of the garment might play.

It would be black so I think that would be okay?

These different processes aren’t necessarily interchangeable as far as price, availability, durability and looks are concerned either.

The only type of transfer for a black t-shirt is one with a white base. And you can’t feather the white. From past experience, these tend to crack quickly if laundering includes high temp dryer, and they also smell bad. At least to me.

A standard dye sub transfer without the white base has to go on a light colored T-shirt.

Direct to garment printing may be your only choice (short of finding someone that can do process color halftone screening with white ink.) Direct print machines can print a feathered white glow with the darker blue highlights as you show in your example. They may not last as long as silkscreen, but they don’t stink like and crack like the transfers.

A good T-shirt place will have DTG printers, or access to them. They are much more common now than they were 5 years ago.

©2019 Graphic Design Forum | Contact | Legal | Twitter | Facebook