Question about stickers for glass door

Hello.
I want to know how to deliver a maquette to a client that contains letter stickers and a logo for a glass door.
Is there something special i have to add? Like a cutting line or so?
Can someone share an example?
Thank you!

I’ve never heard the term maquette in relation to graphic design before.

The window graphics I’ve done in the past have either been cut vinyl or the 3M perforated window film. The former works well for one color or spot color jobs. The latter works well for four color art.

Thanks for the quick reply!
Sorry for my bad english.
All i wanted to ask is how do i send the file? As a pdf? should i make cut lines arount the letter and the logo? And how do i show where to place it (in which exact spot in the glass door).

How about asking the vendor directly? It might sound revolutionary, but can be quite effective sometimes.

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If it’s spot color stock sign vinyl going on the door, you need to send the vector file made in Adobe Illustrator. Send it as solid shapes, preferable with the colors as they appear in the finished piece, not outlined strokes.

Convert all text to outline and expand all stroked lines.

If it is any kind of printed vinyl, you need to send the layout file with the cut path on its own layer above the art. It should be a non-printing layer but if you label it appropriately it’ll be fine.
The file should be a native Illustrator or Indesign file.
DO NOT FORGET YOUR BLEEDS if this is a cut out print. 1/4" (6mm) minimum.

You should also send a hardcopy showing the cut path visible as a PDF so both your client and your printer know what’s going on.

As for placing it, you need a dimensioned photo of the door, then place the art, then write in the dimensions (or use my favorite plug-in, CADTools for Illustrator)

Where you mention text and logo shape, If this is just stock vinyl, just send it as a layout with the text converted to outlines and the logo shape in vector with the colors applied.
Stock vinyl is its own bleed so you don’t have to worry about. Most stock vinyls are the same color front and back.

If that logo shape has to be printed then you have to consider what the other side of the glass will look like. Most printable vinyls are only white or gray on the back. The only product that looks really cool is a color/white/color print done on a clear film and applied to the entire glass pane. You can spot mount it as a rectangle, but you really can’t cut it to contour.

And the thing everyone forgets. Glass is Green. Unless it’s the very expensive low iron glass, when you look thru the glass at an object, like light colored vinyls, it will turn slightly green tinged.

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@PrintDriver could you tell me why it is so important to send .ai files in this case? Wouldn’t a pdf be enough?

Edit: referring to this post:

If it’s spot color stock sign vinyl going on the door, you need to send the vector file made in Adobe Illustrator. Send it as solid shapes, preferable with the colors as they appear in the finished piece, not outlined strokes.

A lot of sign shops are going to open that PDF in Illustrator to do the file prep because a lot of times it is often easier than doing it in the sign software. Especially if the thing comes in as horrible as most logos these days…

If the thing is printed, most sign shops would prefer a native file over a PDF. PDFs do dumb things with transparency to begin with - and crop marks if you let it. An unstroked cut path won’t translate to PDF if you do it that way (some people do because they are afraid they are going to get printed,) and a PDF out of InDesign can do really weird things to gradients if used. If the cut path is anything other than a rectangle, it has to be translated to the CNC programming.
Why take chances on having a flattened PDF taken apart?

But the best answer is to talk to the end vendor. Failing that, a native file (InD or Illy) with an accompanying PDF is far safer. Corel is a whole other monster. As are the lesser known vector softwares. You may be somewhat safer with a PDF there. Better PDF than .eps. The .eps format should be dead and buried by now. It’s a menace.

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My art director told me that 10 years ago and it’s still there. :smiley:

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