Styles common in Japan

I don’t have anything substantive to say about it, but my lingering interests in hobby stuff (scale models mostly) bring me into contact with visuals like this, and I’m intrigued by the “immature” approach executed with pro-level skills. It’s a bit much, I’d say, but probably accomplishes the objective. It’s a style I see a lot, so I’d infer it works and gets more respect than it might here in the states.

If you come across other examples of Japanese graphic design, it might be fun or interesting to post 'em here and imagine the various markets at which the styles are aimed.

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Any design that sells things is good design.

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I’ve always been intrigued by Japanese design — not just graphic design, but all kinds of design from industrial to architecture.

In addition to the horrendously cluttered, in-your-face retail advertising of the sort HotButton mentioned, the same culture produced the diametrically different serenity of a rock garden, the subtleties of a tea ceremony, and the minimalism of a typical Japanese residence.

I’ve always admired Japanese posters, such as the ones below.

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I’m also interested in Japanese design. A few years ago I tried to do some research into it but couldn’t find anything. I’m really curious about what design education is like in Japan and what kind of principles they focus on.

@Yingtong Can you tell us a bit about Japanese design?

I don’t have a proper training/education about Japanese design (had my education in Singapore), unfortunately, so I’m not the best person to answer your question. Simple designs, geometrical shapes and flat colors are common in most designs here, from what I see.

One of the best representative(s) imo of Japanese design are family crests drawn using only circles and lines.


A brief promo of a NHK program showing how they are made (from 0:59)

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I think its interesting to see how advertisements are portrayed in Japan verses the minimal posts. Theres such contrast between them. I could critique better if I know Japanese, or anything about the culture. I know some things but not enough to say if it is effective. My judgement says — the bright in you face adverts have be to tiring on the eyes.

Japanese advertisement art has always reminded me a bit of when I was a little girl looking at Teen Bop magazine. Those pages were so busy! Loads of pictures of cute teenage boys and hot pinks and purples to catch a young girls eye! Bold, busy, colorful, to an artist it may seem overly done and a bit too much, but to the middle class consumer with 2 teenage daughters that she’s just trying to keep happy, it’s gold. Also was just a very early 90’s thing anyways lol